Could You Have Undiagnosed Diabetes?

The Diabetes/Gum Disease Connection

If you have diabetes, you know that it puts you at risk at developing other chronic conditions; however, did you know that there is a direct link between diabetes and gum health? It’s true.

Individuals who develop diabetes are at a much higher risk of developing serious dental conditions such as periodontitis – an infection of the gums that can be managed but not reversed. In its milder state, called gingivitis, the dentist can clean away tartar during regular dental checkups and effectively treat this condition. However, when left untreated, tartar build-up can cause the gums to bleed, recede, and, if left untreated for prolonged periods of time, gingivitis can progress to periodontitis – one of the leading causes of tooth loss.

So, what is the connection between gum disease and diabetes?

Each condition can directly influence the other.

The key to maintaining good dental health goes beyond regular dental checkups. It’s also important to keep your blood sugar under control. As long as you can maintain good control of your diabetes, your risk for developing peritonitis is no higher than individuals without diabetes.

While individuals with uncontrolled diabetes are more susceptible to gum disease, it is also true that gum disease has a direct correlation on blood glucose levels and may, in fact, contribute to the progression of diabetes.

Furthermore, if you have diabetes you may be at higher risk for fungal infections and cavities.

  • That’s why you’ll want to take a proactive stance to prevent complications of the teeth and gums due to diabetes.

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Itchy Skin May Be a Warning Sign of Type 2 Diabetes

Itchy Skin May Be a Warning Sign of Type 2 Diabetes

It’s winter, and one of the tell-tale signs of the season often emerges as dry and itchy skin. However, did you know that these symptoms can also be warning signs of Type 2 diabetes? It’s true.

Pruritus, which simply means “itching,” is a common symptom of diabetes. While it’s always a good idea to keep your skin moisturized, there are common conditions associated with diabetes that may cause your skin to itch, crack, and peel.

There are various underlying causes that can lead to diabetic pruritus. Here are three of the most common chronic conditions.

Poor circulation. Individuals who experience itching in the feet and lower legs may be experiencing the result of poor circulation. Poor circulation causes narrowing and hardening of the blood vessels, which, in turn, causes noticeable itching on the surface of the skin.

To lessen the severity of the itching, consider taking the following action steps:
• Eliminate the use of tobacco
• Adopt a regular exercise routine
• Keep blood glucose levels in check

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Could You Have Undiagnosed Diabetes?

Could You Have Undiagnosed Diabetes?

Millions of people live with diabetes. Unfortunately, many people don’t even know they have it. In fact, according to the American Diabetes Association, nearly 7 million individuals have undiagnosed diabetes. This condition is not only life-threatening; it is also costly. Annually, health care costs for diabetes is approximately $18 billion per year.

There are many myths surrounding this disease. First and foremost, because most adults know at least one person who has been diagnosed with diabetes who lives a “normal” lifestyle, many do not consider it a serious health issue. This is simply not true. Two out of three individuals who are diagnosed with this disease will die from a heart attack or stroke. In fact, according to recent data, more individuals die from diabetes than from breast cancer and AIDS combined.

Another myth is that overweight individuals will eventually develop diabetes. Although obesity does put an individual at risk, the fact remains that many who are diagnosed with diabetes are at their optimal weight or just slightly over, and, furthermore, most obese individuals will never develop diabetes. Still, it’s a good idea to keep your weight in check as a preventive measure. Genetics and a family history of diabetes are also significant risk factors that play a key role in whether an individual will eventually develop this condition.

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Natural Ways to Prevent Kidney Stones

Natural Ways to Prevent Kidney Stones

Approximately one million individuals develop kidney stones each year. If you’ve had them, you know just how excruciating the experience can be.

The symptoms may begin as a pain in your back or side – just below the ribs – and often radiates with variations in intensity. Eventually, the pain becomes worse and gravitates toward your groin. Regardless of whether they are as small as a grain of sand or as large as a golf ball, kidney stones can be very painful.

Other symptoms may include nausea and vomiting, frequent and painful urination, foul-smelling urine, and urine that is pink, red, or brown.

Kidney stones form from soluble salts in the urine, such as calcium-oxalate, calcium phosphate, and struvite. These substances form crystals and can bind with other crystals, forming a stone. Although they do not usually cause pain while in the kidneys, stones can become very painful as they pass through the bladder and out the urethra.

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The Diabetes/Gum Disease Connection

3 Myths About Diabetes

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 24 million adults in the United States – 1 in 10 – live with diabetes. Although there are steps you can take to help prevent type 2 diabetes, the number of individuals diagnosed with this chronic condition is not declining. In fact, according to the CDC, if current health trends persist, 1 in 3 adults will have diabetes by the year 2015.

There are two types of diabetes. Type 1 develops when the insulin-producing cells are destroyed by an individual’s immune system, which results in a marked deficiency in insulin. Those who live with Type 2 diabetes, however, produce insulin but do not secrete enough of it, or the body does not use that insulin properly.

Individuals who have been diagnosed with diabetes are often concerned about the changes they will have to make in their lives, such as taking insulin, adopting a healthier diet, and exercising regularly. Unfortunately, there are a lot of myths about this chronic health condition. If you or someone you care for has been diagnosed with diabetes, it’s important to understand the difference between diabetes fact and fiction.

Here are three myths about diabetes that continue to live on.

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What are some natural ways to combat neuropathy in diabetes sufferers?

What are some natural ways to combat neuropathy in diabetes sufferers?

When neuropathy occurs in the body as a resulting side-effect of diabetes, it’s important to determine the root causes and specific mechanisms that produced the associated symptoms of neuropathy in the first place.

Often times what happens with sugar dysfunction associated with diabetes is a substance called glucocorticoid – a hormone produced in response to blood sugar that suppresses insulin production.

It also increases the scarring on the internal walls of the smalls vessels the furthest away from the heart – usually the feet and the hands, but most commonly the feet when associated with diabetes.

This hormone production then attracts a group of cells known as foam cells that migrate to these locations … they feed on the inflammation, and as a byproduct, create additional inflammation that causes further narrowing of these vessels.

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